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Knowledge Maturity and the Scientific Value of Innovations : The Roles of Knowledge Distance and Adoption

By: Capaldo, Antonio.
Contributor(s): Lavie, Dovev | Petruzzelli, Antonio Messeni.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookDescription: 503-533 p.Subject(s): innovation | knowledge maturity | technological distance | geographical distance | knowledge adoptionOnline resources: Volume 43, Issue 2, February 2017 In: DEBORAH E. RUPP JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENTSummary: How does the scientific value of innovations vary with the maturity of the knowledge that underlies them? We reconcile conflicting views in the innovation literature by introducing a contingency perspective that underscores the role of knowledge distance along technological and geographical domains. We predict an inverted U-shaped effect of knowledge maturity on the scientific value of new innovations. We further suggest that incorporating geographically distant knowledge can enhance the value contribution of knowledge maturity, whereas incorporating technologically distant knowledge or waiting for the adoption of knowledge in the industry mitigates this value. Our analysis of 5,575 biotechnology patented innovations offers support for our conjectures. We thus advance research on knowledge management and innovation by underscoring the temporal aspect of innovation and its interplay with technological and geographical distances.
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Vol 43, Issue 2\ 5557073JA9 (Browse shelf) Available 5557073JA9
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How does the scientific value of innovations vary with the maturity of the knowledge that underlies them? We reconcile conflicting views in the innovation literature by introducing a contingency perspective that underscores the role of knowledge distance along technological and geographical domains. We predict an inverted U-shaped effect of knowledge maturity on the scientific value of new innovations. We further suggest that incorporating geographically distant knowledge can enhance the value contribution of knowledge maturity, whereas incorporating technologically distant knowledge or waiting for the adoption of knowledge in the industry mitigates this value. Our analysis of 5,575 biotechnology patented innovations offers support for our conjectures. We thus advance research on knowledge management and innovation by underscoring the temporal aspect of innovation and its interplay with technological and geographical distances.

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